The Gustavian Weekly

No tricks, just a lot of treats | The Gustavian Weekly

By Cyan Spicer - Opinion Columnist | October 12, 2018 | Opinion

Some organizations host trick-or-treating for local children.

Some organizations host trick-or-treating for local children.

It’s that time of year yet again. Leaves are changing colors, classes are in full swing, there are tons of spooky decorations all over campus, and a lot of people are preparing themselves for any and all Halloween celebrations.

The spooky season is upon us, and like every year, there are many people who are filled with a lot more Halloween spirit and excitement than others. Walking through campus, there are clear signs in the buildings, and dorms especially, that show who is already very much into Halloween.

Although it is now common to see spooky decorations and hear talk of scary movies, haunted houses, or what costumes people are thinking of wearing this year, Halloween hasn’t always been a celebration of the frightful stuff.

Halloween actually derives from around 2,000 years ago from the Celtics, who celebrated their new year on November 1. Since then, however, Halloween has become a different kind of celebration, but a celebration nonetheless. People of many age groups enjoy Halloween, but the question seems to be: how old is too old to celebrate Halloween?

The answer, although a bit lengthy in explanation, is that there is no ‘too old’ to celebrate something. “You’re only too old when it stops being fun for you,” First-year Sophie Pflunger said. Eloquently said, I believe. There are many people who are always going to find Halloween fun, and there are those who despise Halloween from a young age.

The holiday isn’t strictly made for children, nor is it made to stop being fun for people at a certain age.

Even if it is a ‘kid’ holiday, there’s no reason that older people cannot still enjoy such things.

“First off, you can never be too old for anything if you like it. Second, Halloween is so much fun,” Sophomore Martha Scherschligt told me.

The great thing about Halloween is that it has many parts that can be enjoyable for any age. A younger person can look forward to pumpkin carving, hay rides, going trick or treating, and maybe even a haunted house, whereas older people tend to enjoy the haunted houses as well, but on top of those they can find joy in scary movies, costume parties, and different festivals that are held in celebration of Halloween.

I know plenty of people who are more excited for Halloween than they are for the winter holidays. Even though there’s no break in classes for Halloween, people still find that it brings them more joy and overall, is a lot more fun for them to celebrate than any other holiday.

Halloween brings out a youthful side to people. It’s a fairly innocent thing, getting dressed up, going out to haunted houses, or parties with your friends, watching scary movies, and eating a ton of candy.

It’s childish in the best of ways. There are ways that people celebrate Halloween that isn’t very childish, of course, but overall the holiday brings out a younger side of those who really choose to celebrate the holiday.

Yes, plenty of people do not enjoy the holiday, but just because you might not like Halloween doesn’t mean everyone your age has grown out of enjoying it.

The things we enjoy are ours to enjoy, and no one can tell you to stop loving Halloween in the way you do, or to start loving it when you don’t.

There is no ‘too old’ to enjoy Halloween because there’s no ‘too old’ to enjoy anything, really. As long as it doesn’t hurt anyone else, no one should be trying to take away the things that make us happy.

That’s why I say that Halloween is a celebration for anyone who chooses to celebrate it.

There’s plenty to do, and many things that aren’t even ‘spooky’, so go out and enjoy the season. There is absolutely no reason for anyone to tell you can’t go and enjoy the scary side of life, every once in a while at least.

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