The Gustavian Weekly

Campus Safety Report (2/24/17)

By The Weekly Staff | February 24, 2017 | Campus safety report

Thursday, February 16

A Collegiate Fellow responded to a noise violation in Sohre Hall.

Friday, February 17

A report was submitted about a College policy violation observed in the Jackson Campus Center on Wednesday, February 15, 2017, for case day t-shirts being distributed in the building.

Saturday, February 18

A Collegiate Fellow reported a fire extinguisher missing from North Hall.  The extinguisher was later recovered.

Campus Safety responded to an of-age alcohol violation on College grounds near College View Apartments involving one non-student.

Campus Safety responded to an of-age alcohol violation outside of Sorensen Hall involving one student.

Campus Safety responded to a report of students on the roof at Arbor View Apartments and referred two students to the campus conduct system for a safety/policy violation.

Campus Safety responded to College View Apartments for a report of property damage.  A drinking fountain was dislodged from a wall and was leaking.

A Collegiate Fellow documented an alcohol violation in Prairie View Apartments involving two students.

Campus Safety responded to a 21 and over alcohol violation in College View Apartments involving one non-student who was issued a trespass warning and escorted off campus.

Sunday, February 19

Campus Safety and Residential Life responded to an alcohol violation in North Hall. One student was referred to the campus conduct system for a 21 and over alcohol violation.

Campus Safety responded to a suspicious circumstance at Chapel View Townhomes. An unknown person knocked on a student’s window and left the scene. Campus Safety investigated and was able to identify the person and determine that a student knocked on the wrong townhouse window when attempting to reach a friend.

Campus Safety and Residential Life responded to an odor of marijuana in Sohre Hall.

Tip of the Week:

Beware of Scams Targeting Grandparents

Minnesota grandparents report a new scam where a con artist impersonates a grandchild in distress. The con artist exploits the love and generosity of the grandparent by pretending to be a grandchild in trouble and in need of emergency funds. The fraudster then convinces the grandparent that they are assisting a grandchild to pay for transportation home from a foreign country, for medical treatment, or for bail.

The FBI reports the grandparent scam has been around for a few years— their Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) has been receiving reports about it since 2008. Thanks to the Internet and social networking sites, criminals can sometimes uncover personal information about their targets, which makes the impersonations more believable. Sometimes they hack into people’s email accounts and send messages to everyone in their contact list.