The Gustavian Weekly

Disregarding public concern is dangerous

By Philip Evans - Managing Editor | November 11, 2016 | Opinion

Evans argues that Trump received many of his votes because people couldn’t vote for Clinton. “A large number of people could never see themselves voting for Clinton, the establishment she represents, and the heedless debating methods of her supporters,” he said.

Evans argues that Trump received many of his votes because people couldn’t vote for Clinton. “A large number of people could never see themselves voting for Clinton, the establishment she represents, and the heedless debating methods of her supporters,” he said.

It was foretold that the election on Tuesday would be one of the most crucial events in American history.

While the future will decide the validity of that statement, I would like to argue that election day was far from that, and that quite frankly, it won’t ever get close.

The most critical questions were left unanswered during the entire election procedure by a process that was faulty since the get-go.

The American people have, time after time, had to accept the obscure, new reality that they’ve been put in.

The Democrats were unable to prepare for business after Obama, and the Republican party didn’t realize the tornado that is Donald Trump until it was too late.

That is the major reason Hillary Clinton lost this election, rather than Donald Trump winning it.

The managerial incompetence of both parties leaves me astonished, as any other candidate with a decently clean political background, solid oratory skills, some liberal ideas and a cautious mindset would have swept this election. Bernie Sanders came close.

While he emphasized his social-democratic vision during the primaries, something tells me that he would have toned down that rhetoric and realized what compromises would be necessary in order to seize the votes of people who voted against Clinton.

This is key. A large number of people could never see themselves voting for Clinton, the establishment she represents, and the heedless debating methods of her supporters.

Throughout the entire election period non-Hillary voters and Trump supporters have been sneered at and ridiculed.

They have been referred to as “uneducated”, and while that might be true in an academic sense, there is, and should never be, any reason for such contempt towards an entire social class to be accepted.

People decide who they vote for with a variety of different reasons, and referring to it as being uneducated if voting for Trump only stirs on the social divide.

Drawing associations between any person’s academic background and their choice in presidential candidate is, to use a word often uttered by people performing this behavior, bigotry.

The strategy of hoping that people you’ve dismissed as stupid and racist will vote for your candidate is one I will never understand.

The same behavior is found within European politics as well, and the anti-establishment retaliation is just as strong there.

Swedish political party “Sverigedemokraterna”, referred by themselves as “the only real opposition party” within the current 8-party system that Sweden supports, could reach lone majority by their next general election.

The ways of Donald Trump might be unpleasant, but beneath the disagreeable behavior lies a grave concern for the future of this country.

Germany, France, and Great Britain, with Brexit being their poster headline this past summer, are experiencing similar trends.

It isn’t necessarily nationalistic, conservative or anti-immigration beliefs that generate these responses, although that seems to be the common consensus.

Instead, anxiety is growing in the western populations as governments seems to disregard their core duties of sustaining food, shelter and freedom.

Electing Hillary Clinton, maintaining the status quo and denying the concerns of large amounts of people is one I believe many voters objected to.

So here we are now, with a divided America, a divided European Union, and with a people that is lacking hope and is too afraid to express their true opinion when pollsters come knocking.

To you who are confounded and horrified by the outcome of the election, step down from the piedestal you are on and realize that denial contributes to the creation of these dangerous politicians.

The ways of Donald Trump might be unpleasant, but beneath the disagreeable behavior lies a grave concern for the future of this country.

It is perfectly fine to acknowledge and share the worries of a candidate you dislike without supporting their way of solving them.

1 Comment

Comments are the sole opinion of the visitor who submitted the comment and do not necessarily reflect the views of the author of the article, its editors, or The Gustavian Weekly or Gustavus Adolphus College as a whole.

  1. Kelli says:

    Your’s is a point of view where real intgilleence shines through.

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